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Is the concept of anarchy reliant on the concept of state, or does anarchy stand on its own?

0 votes
Maybe the true value of anarchy is not what is is against but what is offers in possibilities, yet for the most part ... well i guess even by its definition it is anti-government, anti-hierarchy, anti-capitalism.  But does anarchy actually offer more to the entire population?
asked Jul 9, 2012 by afunctionalworld (2,050 points)
Anarchy does not offer anything to anyone. Why do you insist on creating the conditions for quantitative responses? What's with this economism?
Anarchy actually offers a whole new beginning of possibilities, not just the ending to the continual failure of state run systems.  It offers an opportunity to go in a new direction and to block the return of the old ways by making the old ways obsolete.  Unless you do, another form of domination and rule will replace the old.

The world could operate within the conditions of anarchy without rule and money, there just needs to be an alternate design set up to serve people rather than for people to serve the design.  A design not made or dictated by an individual, a group, or  the majority.   A design that does not cross over  conviction, preference, or choice.   A design based on supply of needs, improvement of the quality of life for people and the planet, and maintenance of structures, homes, transportation, and technologies.  That these are available not required.

2 Answers

–2 votes
Don't know if I agree, but the Invisible Hand Society tells us government is anarchy's way of creating more anarchy.
answered Jul 30, 2012 by Judizann (160 points)
+1 vote
The words "anarchy" and "anarchism" canĀ“t be reduced to being against the state and to "anti-statism". There are plenty of non state and even anti-state social groups that are hierarchical and authoritarian such as capitalist businesses and mafia and gang organizations and so they cannot be considered "anarchy" in existence or "anarchist" groups because of their being hierarchical (they have hierarchies, ranks, bosses and in the case of bussinesses specific "owners")

Anarchism means being against hierarchies and not just those present or created by the state and so perhaps the closest word to anarchism might be "anti-authoritarianism". Non-state hierarchies that have been fought by anarchists include class hierarchy at the workplace and at production, those created by religion and church, educational in school contexts both state, religious and private, and also others such as patriarchy.
answered Aug 6, 2012 by iconoclast (3,240 points)
I agree that all power-over, domination systems violate anarchist philosophy. Systems of coercion that force people against their will is contrary to voluntarism. Religion is coercive because it uses threats, often against children, to compel people to act. There is nothing voluntary about this. As for the "businessman"; if he does not force anyone and is peaceful, he can be an anarchist.